Translational Research: Department of Family Medicine

CURRENT STUDIES

The Study to Investigate the Potential of Probiotics in Yogurt II (SIPPY II) Study

The SIPPY II Study was designed to further the research of The SIPPY Study. As with the SIPPY study, the purpose of this study was to determine if the consumption of a yogurt drink would decrease illnesses and absences from daycare or school, however there were some differences between the studies. The participants in SIPPY II were between the ages of 2 and 4 and there were different sponsors for the studies. All of the participants have been recruited for this study and they are currently completing the intervention phase of the study.

Probiotics in Healthy Adults to determine Safety and Efficacy (PHASE) Study

The purpose of The PHASE Study is to assess the safety of BB-12 yogurt when consumed by generally healthy adults while taking antibiotics. Overall healthy adults that are placed on a 10 day course of antibiotics by their regular physician for respiratory infections will be given a 10 day supply of yogurt either containing BB-12 (active) or not containing BB-12 (placebo) to consume during the period that they are taking antibiotics. Participants are not required to travel and are compensated for their time. The PHASE Study is currently enrolling participants. For more information on eligibility, please contact 202-687-6454 or visit www.thephasestudy.com.

The Nasal irrigation, Oral steroids, antibiotics and Subgroup targeting for Effective management of Sinusitis (NOSES) Study

With funding from the NIH Clinical Trial Planning Grant Program, the broad goal of the NOSES Study is to reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics in acute upper respiratory illnesses. The study aims to determine the effectiveness of different treatments for acute rhinosinusitis and identify prognostic indicators for clinical improvement. Identification of treatments that provide clinical benefit will provide alternative treatment options that reduce symptoms and unnecessary antibiotic use. The study will be performed at three university sites throughout the U.S. and six sites in Europe. The study is currently in the planning phase.

COMPLETED STUDIES

Decreasing Rates of Illness in Kids (DRINK) Study

Probiotics are the active cultures placed in all yogurts. The purpose of this study was to determine if a yogurt drink containing the two active cultures present in commercial yogurts plus an additional one, Lactobacillus casei, could prevent illnesses in school in daycare children. Each child participating in the study (aged 3 to 6 years old) was given a 90-day supply of 6-ounce strawberry flavored drinks. Some children were given acidified milk, while others were given yogurt drinks containing Lactobacillus casei. This study is currently under review for submission into a journal.

Research to Measure the Influence of Kefir on Children's Stools When on Antibiotics (MILK) Study

While antibiotics play an important role in keeping children healthy, they also cause diarrhea in approximately 20-30% of those who take them. The purpose of this study was to determine if kefir (a dairy drink containing multiple probiotics) can help prevent and reduce the percentage of diarrhea in children caused by taking antibiotics. Each child that participated in the study (1 to 5 years old) was given a 10-day supply of 5-ounce lime flavored kefir milk drinks to consume during the period they were taking antibiotics. There were no significant differences between the amount of diarrhea in either the active or placebo group; however, there were differences amongst gender and age groups. More information about the results can be found here.

 

The SIPPY Study LogoThe Study to Investigate the Potential of Probiotics in Yogurt (SIPPY)

The active cultures in yogurt have been found to help prevent certain illnesses in children such as diarrhea, allergies and the common cold. The purpose of this study was to determine if the consumption of a yogurt drink would decrease illnesses and absences from daycare or school. Each child that participated in the study (1 to 3 years old) was given a 90-day supply of 4-ounce strawberry flavored yogurt drinks. Some children had the regular strawberry yogurt with two active cultures, while others had the drink with an additional yogurt culture. The two groups’ results are currently being compared and analyzed. This study is under review for submission into a journal.